Workshops

CONOP

Numerical Biochronology 

Hands-on application to real Paleozoic data sets will explore a range of options in the CONOP (CONstrained OPtimization) software, written for Windows (XP, 7, 10) 32-bit and 64-bit operating systems (or Windows emulation on Mac computers). Course notes, the CONOP program and data-manager, manuals and sample datasets will be provided to all participants. CONOP conducts brute-force, trial-and-error searches that employ a simple physical analogy rather than esoteric mathematics. We will use it to mimic the logic of several different seriation programs. Peter Sadler, UC Riverside


Timetree

Timetree Methods for Beginners

An overview of commonly used methods and programs for constructing time trees with molecular data and calibrations from the fossil record. Mark Springer, UC Riverside


PBDB

Paleobiology Database 

This hands-on workshop will introduce participants to the scope of data stored within the PBDB, the workflow for entering information, methods for searching and downloading data, and tools and lesson plans for research and educational activities. Please create a guest account at "Join the PBDB" at paleobiodb.org before you come, and bring your laptop to the workshop. Matthew Clapham, UC Santa Cruz


ElectedOfficials

Talk to your elected Officials! 

A workshop on communication and public policy for Paleontologists:  Current issues and events impinge on science in a variety of ways; some directly, some indirectly. Many scientists, including paleontologists, would like to share an informed opinion about these issues with their representatives in local, state, or national government, but may feel that they lack the necessary skills or vocabulary to do so. What are the current and pending issues? How can we be most effective in communicating our knowledge and opinions? Which approaches work well and which work less well? This workshop is intended to provide guidance on a range of options for establishing and maintaining communication with elected officials, from making an initial telephone call to visiting Washington, D.C. for an in-person meeting. Sandy Carlson, UC Davis

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